Creating FACT Configuration Files

From DocWiki

Revision as of 22:08, 23 May 2008 by Lorlando (Talk | contribs)
(diff) ← Older revision | Latest revision (diff) | Newer revision → (diff)
Jump to: navigation, search

For FACT to fully analyze a network you must configure files that provide FACT with information about the network fabric. FACT has four types of configurations for which you must set up configuration files in the following order:

  • Master configuration file
  • Managed-node definitions file (optional)
  • GUID name definition file (optional)
  • Credentials file

Note: FACT can operate with no configuration; however, the application is minimally useful in an unconfigured state. To use FACT without configuration, you must run FACT on the same host as the HSM and as the super user.


Contents

Creating a Master Configuration File

The master configuration file tells FACT how to get started, how to find the repository, how to find the credentials files, and how to find the necessary information that it needs to connect with the network that it must analyze. For information about master configuration files, see About Master Configuration Files.


To create the master configuration file, perform the following steps:

Step 1 Using a text editor, create the master configuration file in your home directory. Begin by entering the following line into the file:


credential-file: ~/.fact-credentials


Step 2 To define managed-nodes so that FACT can connect to the management ports and collect the necessary information from the switches in the fabric, add lines to the file that specify the DNS names or IP addresses of each of your managed IB switches. Optionally, specify the names of each of your hosts. If you are using the HSM, you must specify that host in the master configuration file, called .fact.conf.

a. The lines for a Cisco SFS Server Switch running SFS OS appear as the following:
managed-nodes: SFSOS switch
b. The lines for a Cisco SFS 7012 or Cisco SFS 7024 Server Switches appear as the following:
managed-nodes: OEM switch
c. The lines for a host appear as the following:
managed-nodes: host


You can use a node list expansion for the name if several devices have similar names. For example, if you have a small network with eight hosts, a Cisco SFS 3001 Server Switch, and a Cisco SFS 7012 Server Switch, and their DNS names are myhost1 through myhost8, my3001, and my7012, respectively, you would create the following master configuration file:

credentials-file: ~/.fact-credentials
managed-nodes: host myhost[1-8]
managed-nodes: SFSOS switch my3001
managed-nodes: OEM switch my7012


Step 3 Save the file.


Creating a Separate Managed Node Definitions File (Optional)

If your configuration is too large or complex to describe inline in the master configuration file, you can create a separate managed nodes definitions file. (For more information about managed node definitions, see About Managed Node Definitions Files.)


To create a managed node definitions file, perform the following steps:

Step 1 Using a text editor, create the managed nodes definitions file in your home directory.

Step 2 For each managed switch that is running SFS OS in your network, add a line to the managed note definition file that specifies the name or IP address:

SFSOS switch name

Step 3 For each OEM-managed switch that is in your network, add a line to managed node definition file that specifies the name or IP address:

OEM switch name

Step 4 (Optional) If you do not want FACT to collect additional diagnostic information from the hosts, add a line to the managed node definition file that specifies the hostname or IP address:

host name

Step 5 Add the managed node definition file to the master configuration file:

managed-node-file: ~/mnode-definition

Step 6 Save the file.


Creating a GUID Name Definition File (Optional)

For easy identification, you may choose to assign any name to a GUID. If you choose not to assign names, GUIDs may still be identified by their numbers. For more information about GUID name definitions, see About GUID Name Definitions.

To create a GUID name definitions file and assign names to GUIDs, perform the following steps:

Step 1 Using a text editor, create a file.

Step 2 For each GUID, create a name definition that contains the following two pieces of information, separated by a space:

a. the eight-byte GUID
b. the name you choose to assign it

The following example shows a possible name definition file:

  00:11:22:33:44:55:66:77 switch01
  00:11:22:33:44:55:66:78 switch02
  00:11:22:33:44:55:66:79 switch03
  11:22:33:44:55:66:77:88 host01

Step 3 Save the file.

Creating a Credentials File

A credentials file is the place in which you store the information that tells FACT how to log in to other machines or managed-nodes. You create a user name and password for each node into which FACT can log in. For more information about credentials files, see About Credentials Files.


To create a credentials file, perform the following steps:

Step 1 Create a file named .fact-credentials in your home directory using a text editor.


Step 2 For each managed node (switch or host) that you listed in the master configuration file that you previously created, called fact.conf, add a username and a password that FACT can use to log in to that managed node. For Cisco switches that use SFS OS, use "super" as both the default username and password; for OEM switches, which are the Cisco SFS 7012 and Cisco SFS 7024, use "admin" as both the default username and password, as shown in the following examples:


Cisco SFS OS switches
user: super
password: super


OEM switches
user: admin
password: admin


Step 3 (Optional) You can use wildcards if several devices use the same username and password.

host myhost[1-8]
user: myname
password: secret


For more information about wildcards, see Wildcard Values.


Step 4 Save the file.

Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

Personal tools