Cisco Unified MeetingPlace Release 6.1 -- System Configuration Information

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Cisco Unified MeetingPlace Release 6.1 > Cisco Unified MeetingPlace Audio Server > Planning the installation > Information Types



System configuration information controls how Cisco Unified MeetingPlace operates at your organization. You provide information describing the telephony and video configuration, and describing the LAN to which Cisco Unified MeetingPlace is connected.


This section contains the following information:


Contents

Telephony Configuration Information

Telephony configuration information includes port access information that determines which services are available to callers.


The information also describes the type of signaling used by each port. Because multiple ports can use the same signaling, the database lets you organize any of the 1,152 Cisco Unified MeetingPlace ports into port groups. Port groups define signaling information for multiple ports simultaneously.


This section describes the information you need to:

  • Assign an access type to each port.
  • Decide whether to define port groups.


Cisco Unified MeetingPlace Port Access Types

The Cisco Unified MeetingPlace services available to callers are determined by the port access type that the system assigns to the call. Cisco Unified MeetingPlace includes three port access types, as described in Table: Port Access Types.


Table: Port Access Types
Port Access Type Description

Meeting access

Allows callers to attend meetings.

Profile access

Allows callers to attend meetings, schedule meetings, and listen to recorded meetings and messages, and change information in their user profiles. (For more information, see the User Information.) Callers without user profiles cannot schedule meetings and do not have user profile privileges.

Combined access

Available only to users with user profiles. Combined access allows callers to attend meetings, schedule meetings, listen to recorded meetings and messages, and change information in their user profiles.



When Cisco Unified MeetingPlace receives dialed number information (DID/DNIS), the port access type the system assigns to a call is determined by the access type assigned to the phone number used to reach it.


When Cisco Unified MeetingPlace does not receive dialed number information, the port access type that the system assigns to a call is determined by the access type you assign to the port that is handling the call.


Defining Telephony Access

Table: Telephony Access describes the telephony access by country.


Table: Telephony Access
Country Telephony Access

European Union

Cisco Unified MeetingPlace can receive both DDI/DNIS and ANI/CLI (the European equivalent of ANI) when it is connected to the phone network through E1 PRI trunks.

Hong Kong

Cisco Unified MeetingPlace can receive both DNIS and Automatic Number Identification (ANI) when it is connected to the phone number through T1 PRI trunks.

U.S. and Canada

Cisco Unified MeetingPlace can receive dialed number information (DID/DNIS or DDI information) when it is connected to the phone network through T1 trunks using E&M Wink Start signaling. When the system receives dialed number information, you can assign different port access types to blocks of phone numbers and reserve the numbers in each block for certain uses.


Dialed Number Information (DNI) digits can be received with T1 PRI trunks. In addition, T1 PRI can provide Calling Party Number information, which T1 CAS does not usually provide.



For example, you can assign the following:

  • Meeting access to one block of numbers to reserve those numbers for callers who only want to attend a meeting.
  • Profile access to a third block for callers with profiles.
  • Combined access to a fourth block for all callers.


If Cisco Unified MeetingPlace receives dialed number information, you must decide how many numbers to reserve for each use. If the system does not receive dialed number information, the configuration information you provide for each port determines the port access types.


Creating Port Groups

To configure multiple ports at one time, organize ports into port groups. The configuration information you enter for the port group, which includes a port access type, applies by default to all ports assigned to the group in the absence of either individual port configuration information or a DID/DNIS access plan.


Port groups are optional, although a port must belong to a port group to be used for outdial.


Default port groups are assigned as follows:

  • Port Group 0 for PSTN
  • Port Group 1 for IP
  • Port Group 2 for E1
  • Port Group 3 for T1 PRI


Configuring Individual Ports

Some configuration information for individual ports is included in a port group definition. Unless you want different information for an individual port than for the group, you only provide this information for the group. Individual port information takes precedence over port group information.


Port configuration information includes a port access type. When Cisco Unified MeetingPlace receives dialed number information, the DID/DNIS access plan determines which type is assigned to a call. If, however, the system cannot use the DID/DNIS or DDI information it receives from the network (for example, the network passes incorrect digits to Cisco Unified MeetingPlace), the configuration information you provide for individual ports determines the port access type.


If your system does not receive dialed number information, decide which access types to assign to each port or group of ports that connect Cisco Unified MeetingPlace to the phone network.


Monitoring Cisco Unified MeetingPlace with SNMP

You can monitor Cisco Unified MeetingPlace by using the Cisco Unified MeetingPlace SNMP option. This feature uses the Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) Release 1 and supports MIB-II.


If your server has an SNMP management tool, you can configure this feature to give you network status information and management access to Cisco Unified MeetingPlace through your network management system. Trap messages are sent to all configured trap community addresses in the following circumstances:

  • The system starts up (coldstart trap).
  • The system generates an alarm (there several different trap types).


The SNMP option consists of two components that you must configure:

  • Network Management Information, which determines the UDP port number used for SNMP queries and allows SNMP queries to be disabled (for higher security).
  • Network Management Communities, which determine the IP address(es) where trap messages will be sent and the community names used for queries (like a password).


Caution! You must load MIB files into the monitoring system and configure them for the trap messages to display properly. For more information, see About Cisco Unified MeetingPlace SNMP.


Server Configuration

Using Worksheet 5-13: Server Configuration and Worksheet 5-14: NS Site Configuration, you enter address information for the Cisco Unified MeetingPlace server on your LAN. Default information is filled in during installation, but you can make changes based on your worksheet information. The parameters also include the number of conference and access ports on each server at your organization.


Using Worksheet 5-16: Other Cisco Unified MeetingPlace Servers (for Multiserver Meetings), you enter information about your organization's other Cisco Unified MeetingPlace servers if you conduct multiserver meetings, whether manual or automatic. These other servers may be geographically dispersed in other states or countries. For more information about multiserver meetings, see About Multiserver Meetings.


Cisco Unified MeetingPlace Audio Server is not aware of DNS. You cannot ping hostnames or use DNS hostnames for configuration.


Cisco Unified MeetingPlace Port Types

The ports that connect Cisco Unified MeetingPlace to the phone and video network are classified as access ports and conference ports. All ports are access ports, and a subset of access ports are preconfigured as conference ports. However, there is no difference between an access port and a conference port.


When the system needs ports to set up a conference call or add people to a call in progress, it allocates them from the pool of available conference ports. If your access ports have all been preconfigured as conference ports and the system requires all available ports, it takes them all. Except for the people attending meetings, no callers can reach Cisco Unified MeetingPlace (for example, to schedule a meeting).


The following safeguards ensure that ports are always available for uses other than conference calls, such as scheduling meetings:

  • Some conference ports are classified as contingency ports. The system keeps these ports in reserve so that people who are participating in a meeting can reach a contact or attendant for assistance. A meeting scheduling parameter determines how many ports in your system are contingency ports.
  • Some remaining conference ports are classified as floater ports (or floating ports). Floater ports float between meetings, and are used when an additional caller joins a meeting that is already full. A meeting scheduling parameter determines how many ports are floater ports.
  • Sometimes your access ports are not all preconfigured as conference ports. The number of conference port licenses you acquire, as listed on your order schedule, is the number of conference ports in your system.


Figure: Access Ports and Conference Ports Uses shows the uses for access ports and conference ports.

Figure: Access Ports and Conference Ports Uses

121564.jpg


1

Access ports reserved to schedule and listen to recorded meetings

3

Floater ports, reserved to handle unexpected meeting attendance

2

Contingency ports reserved to handle call transfers to contacts for attendant

4

Ports in use or reserved for meetings

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